Anglicare SA

6 Startling Facts About Suicide in Australia

In Australia an average of eight people take their own lives every day; that’s one every three hours. Over the years countless organisations have been created...

In Australia an average of eight people take their own lives every day; that’s one every three hours.

Over the years countless organisations have been created to bring this too often overlooked issue into the light, but despite all the campaigns around suicide prevention staged in the past 20 years rates are continuing to rise.

September 10 is World Suicide Prevention Day, and this year’s theme is ‘Take a minute, change a life’ to encourage us to take a minute to think about personal attitudes and behaviours around suicide.

In order to remind us of just how many Aussie families are touched by suicide each year we thought we’d compile a few startling facts that highlight the sheer scale of the issue.

Australia’s suicide rate is at its highest level in 13 years

 
According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) our suicide rate recently hit a 13-year high. In 2015, 3,027 Australians took their own lives.

The increase can be largely attributed to a rise in the suicide rate among middle-aged and young women.

Suicide rate rise

Men are three times more likely to take their own lives

 
While we’ve recently seen an increase in the suicide rate among women, males remain 300% more likely to take their own lives than females.

According to the ABS, “age-specific deaths rates for males aged between 40 and 54 were all greater than 30 deaths per 100,000 males. Suicide accounted for 12.4% of all male deaths for these combined age groups. The age-specific suicide rate for males was lowest in the 15-19 year age group (11.8 deaths per 100,000 males), yet suicide accounted for 28.6% of all deaths in that age group.”

 

Suicide Rates

Indigenous suicide rates are between two and four times those of non-Indigenous Australians in the 15 and 44 age groups

 
While suicide is a big problem across our entire society, for Australia’s Aboriginal peoples, it’s at epidemic proportions.

As the esteemed suicide prevention researcher Gerry Georgatos recently wrote in The Guardian Australia the figures below may not even represent the full extent of the issue.

“Suicide accounts for more than 5% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander deaths… In fact in my estimations, because of under-reporting issues, suicide accounts for 10% of indigenous deaths.”

 

Aboriginal Suicide Rates

According to hospital data, in the 2008-2009 financial year 62% of people who were hospitalised due to self-harm were female

 

Despite the fact that men are three times more likely to take their own lives than women, females account for more than 60% of hospitalisations from self-harm. And this is a phenomenon that is far from being exclusive to Australia.

According to UK based Psychology professor Daniel Freeman this discrepancy is largely due to the different means that the two genders use when attempting suicide.

 

Aus Inst of Health and Welfare

All states and territories except South Australia and Victoria reported a stable or increasing suicide rate from 2014 to 2015

 

With the exception of South Australia and Victoria, all states and territories saw their suicide rate rise in 2015.

Chief executive of Suicide Prevention Australia, Sue Murray, recently told the ABC’s Mazoe Ford that there’s been a 26% increase in the suicide rate among women, a trend that has greatly contributed to the nation’s rising suicide rates.

“We have seen a 26 per cent increase in the suicide rates among women and the numbers of suicides among women (rise) over the last five year period.”

 

Suicide National Stats

Over the past 5 years the suicide rate in Adelaide has increased, while the rate has decreased across the rest of South Australia

 

One of the primary reasons that South Australia’s suicide rate has dropped in recent times is because less people in the state’s rural areas are taking their own lives.

So, despite the rate rising in Adelaide, the massive drop in rural areas has still lead to an overall decrease.

australian-state-and-territory-suicide-data-2015-26-638gfhgfhgfhf

To connect to a community event to mark World Suicide Prevention Day check out the official website: http://wspd.org.au/events/

If you’ve lost someone to suicide and are looking for support services please get in touch with our Living Beyond Suicide team on 1300 761 193.

For support regarding suicide prevention call Lifeline on 13 11 14.

 

Photography by:  Jessica Owen

 

The Ultimate Guide to Northern Adelaide’s Op Shops

As the Australian Council of Social Service (ACOSS) Poverty in Australia 2016 report revealed late last year, more than 3 million Aussies currently live below the...

As the Australian Council of Social Service (ACOSS) Poverty in Australia 2016 report revealed late last year, more than 3 million Aussies currently live below the poverty line.

This concerning piece of research shed light on just how tough times are for low-income earners, and while it can be all too easy for folks who are struggling to make ends meet feel like they have to go without, the truth is, this needn’t be the case.

No matter whether you’re looking for new clothes for your kids, or crockery for your kitchen, Adelaide’s op shops have got you covered.

Adelaide’s Northern Suburbs are particularly rich when it comes to quality second-hand shops, so to celebrate National Op Shop Week 2017 (August 27 – September 2) we thought we’d put together a guide to the northern suburbs’ finest op shops.

So without further ado let’s take a look at what Adelaide’s north has to offer when it comes to thrift shopping.

Shop #1: Salvage & Save

 

A business initiative of Finding Workable Solutions (FWS), Salvage & Save is well worth a visit. Home to a good range of books, plants, clothes, furniture and bric-a-brac, Salvage & Save is a bit of a second hand super store. Even if you’re looking for bigger items such as bikes or electronics, these guys should have you covered.

Keen participants in the work for the dole program and the Australian Disability Enterprises program, when you shop at Salvage & Save you know your money is being well spent.

Salvage&Save2

Where:  Bellchambers Rd, Edinburgh North

Contact: Facebook

 

Shop #2: Boomerang Centre

 

Run by the Elizabeth Church of Christ, the Boomerang Centre is a narrow little nook of store that’s packed to the brim with pretty decent second hand clothes and bric-a-brac.

Not much to look at from the outside, the Boomerang Centre is especially worth visiting if you have small children in need of some new threads.

Boomerang Centre

Where: Ashfield Rd, Elizabeth

Contact: (08) 8255 2467

 

Shop #3: Red Bird Op Shop

 

Situated just off of Main North Road in Elizabeth North, the Red Bird Op Shop is a little gem.

Replete with a superb range of men’s, women’s and children’s clothes, as well as a cool selection of bric-a-brac, this musty, cramped and charmingly old fashioned op shop is one of Elizabeth’s finest.

With all proceeds going towards funding the great work done by the Uniting Church, you know when you’re spending your hard earned at Red Bird that you’re helping those most in need.

Red Bird Op Shop

Where: 4 Hilcott St, Elizabeth North

Contact: (08) 8287 3911

 

Shop #4: CareWorks Community Op Shop

 

Part of the Churches of Christ fundraising initiatives, CareWorks Community Op Shop in Elizabeth North is a sparse little shop with plenty of hidden gems.

Specialising in clothes and homewares this delightful little op shop also stocks a pretty decent range of board games, CDs and bric-a-brac. But if you’re looking for good quality homewares and cooking gear, this is the place for you.

Careworks

Where: Elizabeth North Shopping Centre

Contact: Facebook

 

Shop #5: Thrifty V Superstore

 

The Volunteer Association operate four op shops across Adelaide’s northern suburbs, but there’s no going past their superstore in Elizabeth South.

Chock-full of good quality secondhand clothes (including evening wear and wedding dresses), you could easily spend half a day browsing through this epic thrift shop.

Stocked with all of the usual suspects: books, old PC games, CDs, VHS cassettes and bric-a-brac, plus a worthwhile range of large furniture items such as cupboards and lounges, no northern suburbs op shop tour is complete without a trip to the Thrifty V Superstore.

All profits generated here go towards supporting the work of the Lyell McEwin Regional Volunteer Association.

Thrifty V2

Where: 195 Philip Highway, Elizabeth South

Contact: (08) 8255 8818

 

Shop #6: Hearts4Heros

 

New, clean and neatly presented this store is a long way from the dank, dust ridden op shops that we’re used to.

Spacious, yet filled with heaps of goodies, Hearts4Heros packs a good selection of quality gear. Everything that makes it onto the shop floor here is worth a look, from the (almost brand new) clothes to the well kept kids toys, you could easily drop a couple of hundred dollars in a single visit to the Hearts4Heros Elizabeth South store.

Situated opposite the Rite Price Grocery, all profits from Hearts4Heros go directly to help support military, veterans and emergency service personnel injured on the job.

Hearts4Heros

Where: 1/183 Philip Highway, Elizabeth South

Contact: (08) 8255 5690

 

 

 

Media Statement Re: Paveley family, from AnglicareSA CEO Peter Sandeman

Earlier in the week we received the sad news of the tragic passing of Lucy Paveley whilst on her way to work. Since that time there has been a huge outpouring of...

Earlier in the week we received the sad news of the tragic passing of Lucy Paveley whilst on her way to work. Since that time there has been a huge outpouring of support for Lucy’s family from AnglicareSA staff, our aged care residents and their families – and more widely from members of the general public.

We have stayed close to the family this week – this is a beautiful family that has been overwhelmed by the support people have shown in the darkest moment of their lives.

They have asked that we share how grateful they are for the amazing outpouring of care and concern from the wider community.

The family advised they are taking great comfort from the love that people are expressing. They want us all to know that they are managing, and are certainly comforted by people’s kindness. Lucy’s husband Jamie said that he very much appreciates that people want to support him and the children and that this is helping with the healing process.

Jamie also advised that they do not encourage bitterness, anger or revenge.

It is heartwarming to see that in face of such a sad and senseless tragedy people have rallied together to direct their energy in the form of love and support to Jamie and their children. It is often in such times of tragedy that people feel the need to do something as part of their own way of dealing with their sadness.

The team and residents at AnglicareSA Elizabeth Dutton Court have started their own collection box to support Lucy’s children. We are also directing our staff to the GoFundMe donation site set up by Jamie’s workmates: https://www.gofundme.com/paveley-family-support.

 

New Appointment – Tanya McIver

AnglicareSA is pleased to announce the appointment of Tanya McIver to the role of Site Manager at its Elizabeth Dutton Court aged care facility. Tanya brings...

AnglicareSA is pleased to announce the appointment of Tanya McIver to the role of Site Manager at its Elizabeth Dutton Court aged care facility.

Tanya brings a mix of clinical and management experience to her role at Elizabeth Dutton Court – a warm and welcoming 75-bed facility with a memory support unit and 40 co-located retirement units.

Following 25 years of clinical experience in both hospital and aged care settings, Tanya moved into management roles. She is fully committed to ensuring that a high standard of care and support is provided to residents, their families and staff and notes being particularly passionate about dementia care and end of life care.